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Linkoteca. wordpress


Pantallazo del theme Susty WP para WordPress

Delivering WordPress in 7KB 6KB*

This website aims to act as a guide to making WordPress websites more sustainable, and to serve as a practical example of how we can tune our websites and reduce their carbon footprint. The homepage of this website is delivered to your browser with just 6KB of data transfer. This is achieved by its theme, plugins and configuration. As of 2016, the average website data transfer was 2.3MB, making it 393 times bigger than this website!

…the ability to create and use custom taxonomies has been around since 2007. We didn’t get all the cool functions added until 2.8 though.

However, one thing we’ve had since 2.3 was the ability to create taxonomies for any object type, not just posts. In WordPress, there are several object types:

Posts
Users
Comments
Links

So, you can technically create a taxonomy for any object type. Most of WordPress core support is for posts, but the API is extremely well thought out and can handle the other object types with minimal code effort.

This tutorial will focus on registering and using a taxonomy on the user object type. It will not be a 100% solution for everything you can do with a custom user taxonomy. Consider this an extremely rough draft of what’s possible.

At GPLDL we felt that releasing “Premium WordPress Plugins” and “Premium WordPress Themes” only to people who purchase support licenses constrains the dissemination of GPL-licensed software. So we decided to break up these expensive packages by providing the exact code available from the developers for download at GPLDL.

That’s why we set up GPLDL as a club – legally sharing hundreds of Premium GPL-licensed WordPress items with our members. That gives all of our members access to the code they actually need by removing the developer’s support they are otherwise forced to pay for.

The GPL licence, which is the foundation of WordPress and all plugins in the WordPress repository, is a great license, no doubt. It has permitted WordPress to become what it is today, and have such a wonderful community form around it.

I’m lately seeing a small surge in the number of people who are taking advantage of the GPL in what many consider an unethical way. I’m talking about the WordPress plugin stores that are cropping up and selling plugins developed by other people.

Clearly a project the size of WordPress needs some strong leadership and a clear roadmap. However, when that roadmap starts to be clouded by outside factors such as financial pressure to compete with the market, decisions aren’t made in the best interest of everyone. Don’t forget that whatever is implemented in WordPress.org is being built for WordPress.com (one of the main money-making arms of Automattic) and no doubt their biggest concern when considering losing customers to competitors. Gutenberg is a clear attempt to attract new users to the platform.

The major part of backwards compatibility is not breaking things, or doing everything possible to avoid it. Gutenberg simply will break sites. This won’t be white screening, or breaking appearance on the frontend, but as soon as a site is updated to 5.0, a user will have a broken experience the next time they edit a post, if the site relies on custom meta boxes.

The percentage number of sites on the web that are powered by WordPress is often touted and this number will be made up of a variety of different types of sites and site owners. A large number will be developers, freelancers and agencies who have built sites in the past, manage sites currently, and build every new site with WordPress. From experience, these developers typically don’t use page builder plugins but a combination of custom fields and meta boxes to give clients the ability to add all the data needed to be displayed on the site in a controlled and prescribed style.

These people will need to prepare for 5.0 (more on that later) to make sure their clients aren’t affected by Gutenberg.

Out of all the modern frontend frameworks, React was always the first choice for Gutenberg, even after some token debate, and weathering the storm of patent clauses. But adding a shiny new framework to a critical piece of WordPress core is highly problematic and we’ve seen it before. WordPress 3.5 was released with a new media manager, built with Backbone and landed without documentation, no clear extensibility model, and a steep learning curve for core contributors and developers with media-related plugins.

Gutenberg has the potential to go the same way, but undoubtedly it will reduce the amount of people able to contribute to it, without learning React deeply. It also places a burden on plugin developers (in a short timescale) to learn, adapt, and get their plugins ready.

Of course this is possible for the big guys like WooCommerce (Automattic owned, large team) and Advanced Custom Fields (independant small team, huge user base), but this will affect any plugin which registers a custom post type, or meta boxes. Most developers simply won’t have the time, inclination or skills to make them compatible with Gutenberg. We will likely see a lot of plugins broken which just won’t get fixed. That will have a detrimental effect on user experience and the WordPress ecosystem in general.

Core should leave Gutenberg as a feature plugin for longer. The timeline is just too short for people to prepare. It is too great a change to be rushed. I think the decision to be merged should be rethought and only merged when a certain level of plugin adoption by users is reached.

Add this to your theme’s functions.php:

function alx_embed_html( $html ) {
    return '<div class="video-container">' . $html . '</div>';
}
 
add_filter( 'embed_oembed_html', 'alx_embed_html', 10, 3 );
add_filter( 'video_embed_html', 'alx_embed_html' ); // Jetpack

And next up, we need to add the CSS that makes it responsive to our style.css:

.video-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; }
.video-container iframe, .video-container object, .video-container embed, .video-container video { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }