Autonomía digital y tecnológica

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Linkoteca. inteligencia artificial


OPPRESSIVE A.I. FRAMEWORK

Feministai.net is an ongoing effort, work in progress debate that seeks to contribute to the development of a feminist framework to question algorithmic decisions making systems that are being deployed by the public sector. Our ultimate goal is to develop arguments and build bridges for advocacy with different human rights groups, from women’s rights defenders to LGBTIQ + groups, especially in Latin America to address the trend in which governments are adopting A.I. systems to deploy social policies, not only without considering human rights implications but also in disregard of oppressive power relations that might be amplified through a false sense of neutrality brought by automation. Automation of the status quo, pertained by inequalities and discrimination.

The current debate of A.I. principles and frameworks is mostly focused on “how to fix it?”, instead of to “why we actually need it?” and “for whose benefit”. Therefore, the first tool of our toolkit to question A.I. systems is the scheme of Oppressive A.I. that we drafted based on both, empirical analysis of cases from Latin America and bibliographic review of critical literature. Is a particular A.I system based on surveilling the poor? Is it automating neoliberal policies? Is it based on precarious labor and colonial extractivism of data bodies and resources from our territories? Who develops it is part of the group targeted by it or its likely to restate structural inequalities of race, gender, sexuality? Can the wider community have enough transparency to check by themselves the accuracy in the answers to the previous questions?

What is a feminist approach to consent? How can it be applied to technologies? Those simple questions were able to shed light on how limited is the individualistic notion of consent proposed in data protection frameworks.

Miquela nace en 2016. Un perfil de Instagram daba comienzo a su historia: una joven hispano-brasileña, residiendo en Los Ángeles y proyectando identidad de IT-Girl comenzaba su rastro digital suscitando todo tipo de especulaciones (como que era una campaña para promocionar el juego Los Sims). Después de tres años ya sabemos un poco de qué va la historia: «un estudio transmedia que crea universos narrativos y personajes digitales». Esto es lo que puede leerse en la escueta web (es un Google Doc en realidad) de presentación de Brud.

Yet in the twenty-first century, power will be determined not by one’s nuclear arsenal, but by a wider spectrum of technological capabilities based on digitization. Those who aren’t at the forefront of artificial intelligence (AI) and Big Data will inexorably become dependent on, and ultimately controlled by, other powers. Data and technological sovereignty, not nuclear warheads, will determine the global distribution of power and wealth in this century. And in open societies, the same factors will also decide the future of democracy.

The most important issue facing the new European Commission, then, is Europe’s lack of digital sovereignty. Europe’s command of AI, Big Data, and related technologies will determine its overall competitiveness in the twenty-first century. But Europeans must decide who will own the data needed to achieve digital sovereignty, and what conditions should govern its collection and use.

Flowchart to know if a machine is an AI.

In the broadest sense, AI refers to machines that can learn, reason, and act for themselves. They can make their own decisions when faced with new situations, in the same way that humans and animals can.

As it currently stands, the vast majority of the AI advancements and applications you hear about refer to a category of algorithms known as machine learning. These algorithms use statistics to find patterns in massive amounts of data. They then use those patterns to make predictions on things like what shows you might like on Netflix, what you’re saying when you speak to Alexa, or whether you have cancer based on your MRI.

Google is reportedly working on an A.I.-based health and wellness coach.

Thanks to its spectrum of hardware products, Google would have a notable advantage over existing wellness coaching apps. While its coach, as reported, would primarily exist on smartwatches to start, Android Police noted that the company could include a smartphone counterpart as well. The company could also eventually spread it to Google Home or Android TV. The latter is unchartered territory for these kinds of apps, which are typically limited to smartphones and wearables. With availability in the home, lifestyle coaching recommendations could become increasingly contextual and less obtrusive. If you ask for a chicken parmesan dinner recipe, it could offer a healthier alternative instead; or if you’re streaming music at 10 p.m. and have set a goal to get more sleep, perhaps it could interrupt your music playback to remind you start getting ready for bed. A smartwatch or phone could do this too, of course, but by linking up its product ecosystem, Google could deliver helpful notifications in the context that makes the most sense.